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Reader's Cues: Using Jumplines in Newsletter Design

Jumping Around To Finish The Story

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Jumplines or continuation lines

Jumplines tell where to find the rest of the story

Jumplines, also called continuation lines, typically appear at the end of a column, as in continued on page 45. Jumplines at the top of a column indicate where the article is continued from, as in continued from page 16.
Help readers keep reading by adding jumplines when articles in your newspaper, magazine, or newsletter design continue on another page.

Designing with Jumplines
To keep the jumplines from being read as part of the article, they need to contrast with the body text yet be kept fairly unobtrusive. Try some of these format options or combination of options for jumplines in newspaper, magazine, or newsletter design layouts.

  • Set the jumplines in italics.
    continued on page 25

  • Set the jumplines in boldface.
    continued on page 25

  • Set the jumplines in a contrasting color from the text.

  • Put the jumplines in a sans serif font with serif body text, or the other way around.

  • Use a smaller font.
    continued on page 25

  • Put the continuation line in parentheses.
    (continued on page 25)

  • Right-align jumplines on the same line as the last line of the article. Be sure there is sufficient typographic contrast and/or space between the text and jumplines.

    last line.   continued on page 3

  • Right-align jumplines on the line following the last line of the article. Be sure there is sufficient typographic contrast and/or space between the text and jumplines.

    last line.
             continued on page 3

  • Left-align continued from jumplines at the top of the continued articles. Be sure there is sufficient typographic contrast and/or space between the continuation heads*, jumplines, and body text.

    (continued from page 8)
    more of the article continued here

    *continuation heads are those bits of headlines sometimes used at the top of continued articles to identify the article, especially when multiple articles appear on the same page.

  • Where continuation heads are used, use a portion of that headline in the jumplines.
    SEE "JUMPING" PAGE 3

  • If the article is continued on the following page, the page number could be omitted, the phrase continued on next page used, or the jumpline itself omitted if it is obvious that the article continues.

  • If the article is continued on the following page, the continuation line could become some other indicator such as an arrow.

  • Articles continued on the next page of a two-page spread don't necessarily need a jumpline.

  • When using jumplines, be sure that your newsletter design layout includes page numbers on the pages where the articles continue.

Whatever style you choose, be consistent. Use the same style of jumplines throughout the article and throughout the newsletter design. Set up and use jumpline paragraph styles in your page layout software to maintain consistency of fonts, spacing, and alignment. When proofreading, always verify the page numbers in the continuation lines. Make it easy for readers to keep reading.

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